Adventures in Bee Removal and Relocation in Burlington, NC: Relocation From Farmhouse

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In Florida, bee removal and relocation have become important and necessary crafts. Feral bees invade homes, business structures, and trees, as well as exposed furniture and equipment. It is important to choose a bee company that has the experience and expertise to deal effectively with feral honeybees and wasps.

Adventures in Bee Removal and Relocation in Burlington, NC: Relocation From Farmhouse

Honeybee relocation is our main endeavor. Florida Bee Removal is open 24/7. Raymond Mills, owner of our bee removal and relocation service, has been managing bee colonies since 1962. This amassed storehouse of honeybee knowledge / experience is being passed down to family members. Training starts early in life. Future members of the apian team are instructed in how to become deployable in whatever career path they choose. Apian training draws us closer to our natural world and endows us with a positive, appreciative outlook. Therefore, we believe that bee culture training better prepares us for any of life’s challenges that come our way.

Adventures in Bee Removal and Relocation in Burlington, NC: Relocation From Farmhouse

It was in the fall of 1962 that a neighbor called upon me to remove a huge colony of honeybees from his farmhouse. He did not ask for much—just tear off the entire side of his home, remove the bees alive, and then repair everything to its original condition. My reward was the bee colony, along with the golden treasure of honey between the studs of his structure. It took about a week to complete the removal of about 200 pounds of honey and 10 pounds of ill-spirited, dark-colored bees.

Adventures in Bee Removal and Relocation in Burlington, NC: Relocation From Farmhouse

I have to say that this was quite a learning experience. Since my carpentry skills lacked refinement, I felt obligated to pay a contractor to replace the wood. It cost me a month’s worth of my paper route money.

Despite these bees-in-wall challenges,  I cherished this first bee adventure. The beehive was secured in a woody clearing with a sign that read “Mad bees. They will come after you.”  After 3-4 days, my newly relocated bees were observed working diligently and paid me no attention. I watched them hurriedly depart and return to their hive, their membranous wings glinting in the late fall sunlight.

As the autumn forest sported an array of reds and gold, the bees sensed that frigid winter winds would soon bring foraging to a close. Asters yet bloomed along the roadsides, and foxtail goldenrods waved to a cool wind in the meadows. Thanks to these last vestiges of fresh nectar, along with the honey removed from the farmhouse wall, the honeybees were assured of a successful relocation.

Raymond F. Mills, Beekeeper

beeremoval@floridabeeremoval.com
floridabeeremoval.com